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Nancy Boyd-Franklin Nancy Boyd-Franklin Ph.D.
Columbia

Professor II, Clinical Core Faculty

Office: Psychology, A213
Phone: 848-445-3924
Email: boydfrank@aol.com

Research Interests and Clinical Work:

Multicultural issues; African-American families in therapy; family and couples
therapy; the treatment of inner-city families through a multisystems approach.

Instructor for the Following Courses:
Advanced Supervision in Family Therapy
Advanced Family Therapy
Supervision with African-American Families
Family Therapy
Psychological Intervention with Ethnically and Racially Diverse Populations

Profile:
Nancy Boyd-Franklin's special interests include multicultural issues, the treatment of African-American families, ethnicity and family therapy, home-based family therapy, marital and couples therapy, the multisystems approach to the treatment of poor inner-city families, issues for women of color, the development of a model of therapeutic support groups for African-American families living with AIDS, and issues in working with African American children and adolescents. Her publications include numerous articles and chapters on the above topics. She has written four books including: Black Families in Therapy: A Multisystem Approach; Children, Families, and HIV/AIDS: Psychosocial and Therapeutic Issues; Reaching Out in Family Therapy: Home-Based ,School and Community Interventions, with Dr. Brenna Bry; and Boys Into Men: Raising Our African American Teenage Sons with Dr. Anderson J. Franklin. In 2003, the second edition of her book Black Families in Therapy: Understanding the African American Experience was published. Her honors include receipt of the award for Outstanding Contributions to the Field of Ethnic Minority Psychology and to the Mentoring of Students from Division 45 of the APA (2001), the award for Outstanding Contributions to the Theory, Practice and Research on Psychotherapy with Women from Division 35 of the APA (1996), the Distinguished Psychologist of the Year Award from the Association of Black Psychologists (1994) and the Pioneering Contribution to the Field of Family Therapy Award from the American Family therapy Academy.